You Should Know How To Do This: Basic Automotive Repair and Maintenance | Episode 004

1975 Ford Bronco

On this week’s show we discussed basic car repair and maintenance that you should really know how to do. These basic skills will provide you with a solid foundation on your DIY auto repair journey. Don’t wait until you’re stranded on the side of the road with a flat tire not knowing what to do. Get out there and try it out! If you’ve never tackled something on this list, don’t you worry. A plethora of how-to’s videos are just a YouTube search away. This episode is your friendly kick in the pants to make sure you’re up to speed on basic car repair and maintenance know-how.

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BASIC REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE YOU SHOULD KNOW

  • Changing the motor oil
  • Changing a flat tire
  • Checking all your vital fluids (coolant, oil, transmission fluid, etc)
  • How to jump start your car*
  • Changing disc brake pads and rotors
  • Replacing the battery (check out Tim’s pick for best battery for a minivan)
  • A basic tuneup including replacing your spark plugs and wires
  • Changing your air filter
  • Replacing your windshield wipers
A FEW OTHERS TO CONSIDER
  • Plugging a hole in your tire
  • Flushing your coolant system
  • Restoring your hazy headlights
Here’s a shot of Tim’s 1975 Ford Bronco during his frame-off restoration.

*Josh mentioned portable batteries that can be used to jump start your car. He researched two options that have good reviews. A fancy one and an affordable option.


BONUS SEGMENT

The United States Interstate System

Tim headed up this episode’s bonus segment, and it was a doozy. He presented a brief history of the interstate system for the greatest country on the face of the planet, the U.S. of A. What more could you ask for?

For further reading check out the following resources:

From the Federal Highway Administration – “The United States System of Highways map showing the AASHO-approved U.S. numbered highways as red lines. The map, at approximately 50 inches by 32 inches, is the type of map highway officials framed for display in their offices.”